Managaging organizational change

Organizational Growth Organizational change occurs when a company makes a transition from its current state to some desired future state.

Managaging organizational change

Organizational Growth Organizational change occurs when a company makes a transition from its current state to some desired future state. Managing organizational change is the process of planning and implementing change in organizations in such a way as to minimize employee resistance and cost to the organization while simultaneously maximizing the effectiveness of the change effort.

Today's business environment requires companies to undergo changes almost constantly if they are to remain competitive. Factors such as globalization of markets and rapidly evolving technology force businesses to respond in order to survive.

Such changes may be relatively minor—as in the case of installing a new software program—or quite major—as in the case of refocusing an overall marketing strategy, fighting off a hostile takeover, or transforming a company in the face of persistent foreign competition.

Organizational change initiatives often arise out of problems faced by a company. In some cases, however, companies change under the impetus of enlightened leaders who first recognize and then exploit new potentials dormant in the organization or its circumstances.

Some observers, more soberly, label this a "performance gap" which able management is inspired to close. But organizational change is also resisted and—in the opinion of its promoters—fails. The failure may be due to the manner in which change has been visualized, announced, and implemented or because internal resistance to it builds.

What Is the Meaning of Organizational Change? | ashio-midori.com

Employees, in other words, sabotage those changes they view as antithetical to their own interests. Daniel Wischnevsky and Fariborz Daman, for example, writing in Journal of Managerial Issues, single out strategy, structure, and organizational power. Others add technology or the corporate population "people".

All of these areas, of course, are related; companies often must institute changes in all areas when they attempt to make changes in one. The first area, strategic change, can take place on a large scale—for example, when a company shifts its resources to enter a new line of business—or on a small scale—for example, when a company makes productivity improvements in order to reduce costs.

Managaging organizational change

There are three basic stages for a company making a strategic change: Technological changes are often introduced as components of larger strategic changes, although they sometimes take place on their own.

An important aspect of changing technology is determining who in the organization will be threatened by the change.

What is Effective Organizational Change Management?

To be successful, a technology change must be incorporated into the company's overall systems, and a management structure must be created to support it. Structural changes can also occur due to strategic changes—as in the case where a company decides to acquire another business and must integrate it—as well as due to operational changes or changes in managerial style.

For example, a company that wished to implement more participative decision making might need to change its hierarchical structure. People changes can become necessary due to other changes, or sometimes companies simply seek to change workers' attitudes and behaviors in order to increase their effectiveness or to stimulate individual or team creative-ness.

Almost always people changes are the most difficult and important part of the overall change process. The science of organization development was created to deal with changing people on the job through techniques such as education and training, team building, and career planning.

Resistance to change is normal; people cling to habits and to the status quo. To be sure, managerial actions can minimize or arouse resistance. People must be motivated to shake off old habits.What is organizational change management (OCM.

6 Steps to Effective Organizational Change Management | PulseLearning

Organizational change occurs when a company makes a transition from its current state to some desired future state. Managing organizational change is the process of planning and implementing change in organizations in such a way as to minimize employee resistance and cost to the organization, while.

lead to the change implementation in the organization and then a need to change is planned in the organization through implementation which has unexpected results (Czarniawska & Joerges, ). Managing organizational change is the process of planning and implementing change in organizations in such a way as to minimize employee resistance and cost to the organization while.

Organizational change occurs when a company makes a transition from its current state to some desired future state. Managing organizational change is the process of planning and implementing.

investigation into change within an organizational setting reveals a three-stage process of unfreezing, change and refreezing. Unfreezing is the first stage of the change process and consist of unlearning past behavior. The change process begins when the organization experiences disconfirmation.

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