The tolerance of others beliefs and faith as portrayed by the buddhist christian dialogue

This was a critical question for me and is for many Westerners when I first came to Shin Buddhism: Earlier in my lifeI too had embraced the Christian faith. So when I finally came to hear the Dharma as taught by Master Shinran Shin Buddhism, or Jodo Shinshuthe basic idea of "needing to be saved" sounded eerily familiar, though the context was radically different. Now, I went through that introduction both for context, and also to acknowledge the superficial structural similarities between the two religious traditions.

The tolerance of others beliefs and faith as portrayed by the buddhist christian dialogue

Linkedin A few months ago my mother sent me a monthly newsletter that the San Jose Buddhist church distributes among its members. My mother thought the major article in the newsletter would prove what she had been saying for nearly 30 years — that the differences between Buddhism and Christianity are insignificant compared to what they have in common, and therefore any further discussion between us about these differences would be a waste of time.

In fact, the article compels me to alert my Christian brothers and sisters to the false notions Buddhist leaders teach their followers about Christ.

These misconceptions can seriously impede Christian attempts to evangelize Buddhist people with the saving power of the gospel. What makes presenting the uniqueness of the person and work of Jesus Christ especially difficult is that these Buddhist leaders express nothing but praise and admiration for Jesus.

He claims that both the Buddha and Jesus advocated the same things — such as justice, living joyfully, and being uncompromisingly honest and sincere — and that their lives personified the same noble ideal.

Anyone who responds critically to his assertions is made to sound narrow-minded and intolerant — the prevailing perception non-Christians have of Christians. Meanwhile, Nakasone appears tolerant and sensible — a reputation Buddhists have cleverly fostered about themselves in the West.

He is not speaking directly to Christians or to anyone else outside his religious group. In fact, his ostensible hope is that his people will develop a better understanding and appreciation of the central figure of the Christian faith. Yet what Nakasone purports as the accurate portrayal of Jesus Christ is actually an attempt to undermine the foundation of the Christian faith.

No matter how much he lauds Jesus, he still rejects the biblical testimony of who Jesus is and what He did. Instead, he tells his people that the Bible is the creation of later generations of Christians, who adopted a Jewish teacher from Nazareth and created a myth about him.

Nakasone did not draw his conclusions about Jesus from thin air. Rather, he based his comments on the recent academic work of Burton L.

The tolerance of others beliefs and faith as portrayed by the buddhist christian dialogue

Nakasone asserts that Mack has reconstructed the original gospel of Jesus, which was a collection of sayings recorded during His lifetime by His earliest disciples.

They did not think of Jesus as a messiah or the Christ. First, they receive a false picture of Jesus. Whereas before they probably knew little, if anything, about Jesus, now they come to believe He was an outstanding champion for social justice and personal integrity, but certainly not incarnate deity on a mission to save humanity through His death and resurrection.

Second, they wrongly presume to have a far better understanding of Jesus than we evangelical Christians do.

Third, their confidence in the superiority of their own religion becomes even more ingrained. If Jesus essentially taught what the Buddha taught several centuries after the Buddha had attained enlightenment, then in a sense Jesus was a follower of the Buddha.

Therefore, why abandon the best and highest truth for a religion that only imperfectly reflects and even warps that truth?

To most Buddhists the answer is obvious. Nakasone is not alone in expressing this perception of Jesus.

Religious Freedom and Tolerance

Other Buddhist leaders have adopted the views of liberal scholars like Mack and paraded this inoffensive Jesus among their flocks. It is imperative, then, that we understand the problems that may arise when we share our faith in Christ with our Buddhist friends.Christian-Buddhist Dialogue.

The tolerance of others beliefs and faith as portrayed by the buddhist christian dialogue

The Christian-Buddhist Dialogue in America hile Zen Buddhism began to have a powerful artistic and cultural influence in America in the last half of the nineteenth century, the Buddhist-Christian dialogue officially began with the Parliament of the World Religions in Chicago in The Buddhist-Christian Dialogue O F THE THREE truly 'world religions' Buddhism is the oldest.

Like the other two, Christianity and Islam, it claims to be true for all The first requirement of dialogue is clearly tolerance and a willingness to learn; the second is accurate knowledge of the tradition. the significance for others of a.

The Buddhist-Christian Dialogue O F THE THREE truly 'world religions' Buddhism is the oldest. Like the other two, Christianity and Islam, it claims to be true for all faith in the one God, the all-compassionate, encounters a mystical sense The first requirement of dialogue is clearly tolerance and a willingness to learn; the second is.

The Need for Tolerance Today 'If a person foolishly does me wrong, I will return to him the protection of my boundless love. The more evil that comes from him . A Comparison of Christian Faith and Buddhist Faith by Paul Roberts I would like to explain the difference between Christian faith and Buddhist faith.

Dharma Data: Tolerance: one is reborn is conditioned by one's behaviour not by which god one has faith in. Any good person can have a good rebirth no matter what their beliefs and consequently the Buddhist is able to acknowledge and appreciate the good in other religions. Other beliefs that make Buddhism tolerant are the ideas of.

Interfaith dialogue - Wikipedia